Steven Spielberg has confirmed 'Tintin 2' ''is not dead''.

The 71-year-old filmmaker helmed the first instalment of the beloved Belgian journalist - with Jamie Bell voicing the titular character - and originally 'The Hobbit' helmer Peter Jackson was to take on directorial duties for an upcoming sequel.

However, since the first animated movie came out in 2011, news of the sequel had been quiet but now Spielberg has confirmed that Jackson ''has to do the second part''.

While promoting his latest film 'Ready Player One', Spielberg said: ''Peter Jackson has to do the second part.

''Normally, if all goes well, he will soon start working on the script.

''As is takes two years of animation work on the film, for you, I would not expect to see it for about three years.

''But Peter will stick to it. 'Tintin' is not dead!''

The first movie - which also featured the voices of Daniel Craig and Andy Serkis - follows the young reporter who buys a model of an old ship called the Unicorn.

However, the purchase sparks the attention of a shady character named Sakharine (Craig) but when Tintin refuses to sell the ship, he discovers it contains a clue about hidden treasure.

But before he could locate it, he is kidnapped and given over to the custody of drunken Captain Haddock (Serkis) and they embark on a journey to seek the treasure before Sakharine gets his hands on it.

The franchise was originally planned to be a sequel with Spielberg helming the first, followed by Jackson and the first director was unnamed.

Jackson is currently in post-production with his latest World War One biopic which is set to air this year on the BBC.

Unveiling the project, Jackson and his partners said: ''I've always been fascinated by the First World War due to my own family history and the centenary felt like a unique opportunity to make a personal contribution to the commemoration.

''I wanted to find a way to bring new life to the stories of ordinary people living through extraordinary times.

''The film will be broadcast on BBC One following a UK wide premiere as part of the BFI London Film Festival in 2018.

''The BBC will accompany the film with a 'making-of' documentary with behind-the-scenes footage, interviews with Peter Jackson and an in-depth look at the creative and technical process behind the work.''