Rose McGowan insists the #MeToo movement is an ongoing conversation and hopes it will continue on a path which will stop all types of people from becoming victims of sexual abuse in the future.

The actress-turned-activist accused disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of raping her at the Sundance Film Festival in 1997 and since going public with her claim she has been one of the most prominent campaigners for both the #MeToo and Time's Up movements.

Rose thinks that the two campaigns will continue to evolve and she hopes that ultimately they will bring an end to assaults.

Appearing on Channel 5 TV show 'Jeremy Vine', she said: ''Listen, #MeToo is a conversation, it's about all of us growing up and having an adult conversation that needed to be had a long time ago. Because people are dying, people get killed and die of rape everyday and it starts with sexual harassment and it works its way up and it's insidious. If so many of us are walking round society with this damage then you gotta clean up society don't you.''

Rose, 44, also wants her story to help rewrite a societal narrative surrounding gender, and hopes that in the future young men won't be affected by toxic masculinity tropes which impair their emotions and feelings and stop them from becoming emotional humans.

She continued: ''What I do fight for everybody to realise that everybody gets hurt in some way or another.

''Almost everybody, very few of us escape unscathed and we need to have a serious conversation because kids take it on as their shame; victims take it on as their shame.

''As survivors you come to know that really it's not your scarlet letter and you can give it back and the more we start taking it back, and the more we start talking about boys being stolen and boys being hurt.

''And then getting trapped in this idea that they're not able to express emotion or have anything except for - I'm stereotyping here, but other than playing sports or something like that.

''Now these kids are trapped in these experiences and trapped in the idea of what you're supposed to be as a man - and what does that make you do, that makes you rage and there's this vicious cycle that goes on and on and that's really what I wanted to press the reset button on.''