Rashida Jones struggled to find make-up artists who understood the right foundation for her skin tone.

The 'Claws' executive producer found there were ''limited'' options available for her beauty base when she began her career and the grooming teams always seemed to get the shade ''wrong'' but thinks a lot of progression has been made in recent years.

She told Refinery 29: ''When I first started acting, I remember there being very limited options for foundation. I remember always feeling like any job I got, they would get my skin shade wrong.

''It was either too green or too light -- I was kind of in the middle and they didn't prepare for the middle. As time's gone on, there's more people who look like me, so there has to be a market that caters to people who look like me, which has been great.''

The former 'Parks & Recreation' actress believed lighting has always been a ''big issue''.

She continued: ''If you're doing a scene with a person who's pale, they have to light you differently and it changes the way that a cinematographer, director, and cameraman or camerawoman (hopefully) works. I've seen that grow as well. It's been forced to evolve like everything else.''

Rashida, 43, is currently working on 'Claws' as the executive producer, a show about a diverse group of manicurists who enter the traditionally male world of organised crime and she wanted the programme to have an ''actual representation'' of diversity.

She said: ''With Claws, it was very important to the network, to us as producers, and the creator, that the cast looks the way that it does -- which is the way the country looks. We wanted an actual representation of diversity. But in terms of the aesthetic and the style, I think it really came from the creator, Eliot Laurence, who really wanted this elevated, outlandish, fun, playful, surreal vibe like [Spanish Filmmaker] Pedro Almodóvar's work, which was a huge reference point.

''That means playing with colour, sexuality, and really letting these women have their own individual looks that are so distinct from each other.''