Peter Coyote

Peter Coyote

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Peter Coyote - 2015 Creative Arts Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater- Press Room at Microsoft Theater, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 12th September 2015

Peter Coyote
Peter Coyote
Peter Coyote
Peter Coyote
Peter Coyote

Costa-Gavras and Peter Coyote - Tribute to Academy Award® winning filmmaker Costa-Gavras will feature an on-stage conversation with actor Peter Coyote and the Bay Area Premiere of his latest film Capital (Le Capital) - San Francisco, CA, United States - Saturday 5th October 2013

Costa-gavras and Peter Coyote
Costa-gavras
Magda Wesslund, Michael Schwartz, Susan Schwartz, Costa-gavras, Jennifer Coslett Maccready and Eric Schwartz
Costa-gavras
Costa-gavras, Peter Coyote and Mark Fishkin
Costa-gavras and Jennifer Maccready

Peter Coyote and Stefanie Coyote - SFJAZZ Historic Opening Night Concert San Francisco CA United States Wednesday 23rd January 2013

Peter Coyote and Stefanie Coyote

Peter Coyote - Peter Coyote, San Francisco, California - at the SF Jazz 2011 Gala held at Bimbo's 365 Friday 6th May 2011

Peter Coyote

Peter Coyote and Stephanie Coyote - Peter Coyote, Stephanie Coyote, at The Castro Theater San Francisco, California - The world premiere of Milk - arrivals and inside Tuesday 28th October 2008

Peter Coyote and Stephanie Coyote

The Basket Review


Very Good
It's Hoosiers: Episode 1, in this oddball period piece about the early days of basketball and its arrival in a small Washington farming village. The eccentric new schoolteacher (Peter Coyote) -- he plays German opera in class! -- also brings a game involving the tossing of a round ball into a peach basket. In order to raise money for farm equipment, the town pools together to send the local boys to play against the state champs. Lots of feelin' good ensues.

Written In Blood Review


Weak
Filmmaking lesson #1: When you have a reasonably big star in your movie, don't keep him locked up in a prison cell for the entire time. I mean, it worked for Hannibal Lecter, but Written in Blood is no Silence of the Lambs, though it would desperately like to be.

Peter Coyote is our hapless jailbird, a cop named John Traveller who's suspiciously jailed after murdering his wife and her lover. Or did he? Maybe he's taking the fall for someone else? No matter, there's another serial killer on the loose, and he's leaving clues behind, all references to Sherlock Holmes mysteries. That's right, we've got to deal with Sherlock Holmes as a plot device. This leaves troubled cop Matthew Ransom (Michael T. Weiss, the poor man's Andy Garcia) to try to figure out the case -- and Ransom seeks help from Traveller, a la Clarisse.

Continue reading: Written In Blood Review

Bon Voyage Review


Weak
Roger Ebert once wrote that he would love to see a behind the scenes look at how a bad movie got made. Though it's certainly not the worst movie of 2004, people might get a kick out of a look at the French drama Bon Voyage and how the cast and crew turned a plot revolving around World War II, nuclear explosives, escaped convicts, and unrequited love into such a lifeless experience.

My nominee for the culprit would be the plot, which is convoluted and plodding. In short, Paris is in flux as the Nazis make their advances in 1940. A spoiled, petulant actress (Isabelle Adjani) travels with her new beau of convenience, the Prime Minister, played by a slim Gérard Depardieu. Meanwhile, her childhood friend (Grégori Derangère) - whom she inadvertently framed for murder - has escaped from jail.

Continue reading: Bon Voyage Review

The Hebrew Hammer Review


OK
It's the curse of the great-pitch movie: They can never live up to the premise. And the funny but sloppy The Hebrew Hammer has a premise to kill for. Mordechai Jefferson Carver (Adam Goldberg) is the hero of the title, a badass Orthodox Jew who makes a slight living as a private eye (his door reads "Certified Circumcised Dick") and prowls the streets of Gotham, striking fear into the hearts of anti-Semites and admonishing the kids to "stay Jewish." He rolls like Superfly in an extra-long Cadillac, fully pimped-out, but always observes the Sabbath and loves his mother, of course.

Every superhero needs a supervillain, of course, and this film's answer to that maxim is Andy Dick. Apparently psychotic from birth, Dick plays Damian, the racist son of Santa who kills his more tolerant father and sets about turning the North Pole into a sweatshop, banishing the non-Aryan elves and concocting a diabolical plan to destroy Hanukkah. Not surprisingly, this causes the Jewish Justice League (who hold court in a massive, Star of David-shaped building) no small amount of consternation, and they start casting about for a Jewish hero to fight Damian. Quickly discarding suggestions of Steven Spielberg and Yitzhak Perlman, they reluctantly settle on the Hammer, whom they'd drummed out of the organization long before.

Continue reading: The Hebrew Hammer Review

Sphere Review


Weak
Sphere is one of those movies I hate to review more than I hate to watch. On one hand, you have the numerous good aspects of the film (top notch cast, etc.). On the other hand, you have a plot that can't be passed off in the world of celluloid.

Based on the novel by Michael Crichton, Sphere concerns a team called the ULF team (Unknown Life Form). These people, hand picked by Norman Johnson (Dustin Hoffman) during the cold war, are a team designed to make contact with alien life. On it are a mathmatician (Samuel L. Jackson), an astrophysicist (Liev Schrieber), a biologist (Sharon Stone), and a shrink who didn't take the whole thing seriously and picked people to be at each other's throats (Dustin Hoffman).

Continue reading: Sphere Review

A Walk To Remember Review


Very Good
A Walk to Remember can and will be known best as "The Mandy Moore Project," the first feature where the popular teen singer stars on the big screen. She is the focal point of the marketing, the reason that most kids will see the movie, and the one player to be under the microscope. Luckily for Moore, and the film, her flaws are few, as she slides easily into one of the more interesting teen roles in recent adolescent films, as the originality of her character, her well-metered performance, and director Adam Shankman's lively delivery lift this movie above most of its counterparts.

The film may look like a relative to the Freddie Prinze Jr. vehicle She's All That (1999), but it's more like a cousin to Robert Mulligan's The Man in the Moon (1991). The story begins predictably enough: Landon (Shane West), a young teen sowing his oats through his high school years, is forced to take on charity work after orchestrating a stupid stunt that nearly paralyzes a kid. While mopping up hallways and tutoring youngsters, he comes across Jamie Sullivan (Moore), a level-headed duckling (not so ugly), with a good heart and religion at her core. If this were Prinze pap, Landon would spruce her up and show the world what it's been missing. Instead, in this Karen Janszen adaptation of the Nicholas Sparks novel, Jamie stays true to herself, and the shy girl has a life-changing effect on the guy.

Continue reading: A Walk To Remember Review

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Review


Essential
Break out the Reese's Pieces and the Speak 'n' Spell - E.T. is back, and he's hungry for your blood!!!

Okay, while this 20th anniversary reissue makes a few changes, it's not quite that radical... but if you haven't seen this film since you were 10 years old (like me), it is well worth another visit to the movie. Never mind the updates and alterations -- it's amazing how much I'd forgotten from the original -- which means the update is just as fresh and exciting as it was in 1982. But Steven Spielberg has been tinkering -- and not really in an obvious way like Lucas did with Star Wars. Most notable among the changes (which add about 5 minutes to the running time) are a repaired and expanded opening sequence, wherein we meet E.T. and his alien family, which is forced to leave him behind when those pesky feds get too close.

Continue reading: E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Review

Oil On Ice Review


Very Good
During his 1988 campaign for president, George H.W. Bush made a campaign promise to open a section of the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve (ANWR) to new oil drilling. But just two months into his single term, an Exxon tanker called Valdez smacked into a reef and dumped somewhere north of 11 million gallons of crude onto the Alaskan coast. ANWR was, for the time being, safe from giant drills.

When the next oilman named Bush arrived in Washington 12 years later, ANWR was back on the political table, touted as the greatest boon to support American energy independence. To allay environmental fears, the energy industry spun extraction as non-invasive to native species, and even Alaska's elected representatives dismissed the ecology of ANWR as little more than lifeless white space.

Continue reading: Oil On Ice Review

Femme Fatale Review


Bad
The only thing worse than a bad movie is a bad movie that takes itself seriously. Not only is your intelligence insulted, but the director is revealed to be a snob as well as a failure. And worst of all, the film is usually boring.

Femme Fatale is an exception to this to this rule. There is no question that Brian De Palma's latest is a steaming pile, and you can smell smug all over what he thinks are clever film techniques (split screens, operatic slow motion, etc). But just before I started throwing stuff at the screen in a show of displeasure, something magical happened--I laughed. And once I started laughing at Femme Fatale, I couldn't stop. The resentment felt for losing two hours of my life to this confused, badly acted, illogical, exploitative jewel heist-cum-meditation on fate was replaced with the giddy revelation that I had become involved in a cinematic experience on par with Paul Verhoeven's Showgirls.

Continue reading: Femme Fatale Review

Red Letters Review


Bad
Painfully awful mystery flick has Hawthorne-expert Coyote falling for a prison inmate (Kinski) via postal mail. About as slow as a fourth-class parcel, Red Letters is so convoluted and just plain stupid you'll stop wondering why it went straight to cable after about, oh, 35 minutes.
Peter Coyote

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Peter Coyote Movies

Bon Voyage Movie Review

Bon Voyage Movie Review

Roger Ebert once wrote that he would love to see a behind the scenes look...

The Hebrew Hammer Movie Review

The Hebrew Hammer Movie Review

It's the curse of the great-pitch movie: They can never live up to the premise....

A Walk To Remember Movie Review

A Walk To Remember Movie Review

A Walk to Remember can and will be known best as "The Mandy Moore Project,"...

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Movie Review

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Movie Review

Break out the Reese's Pieces and the Speak 'n' Spell - E.T. is back, and...

Unforgettable Movie Review

Unforgettable Movie Review

Winner of this year's "Most Ironic Title" award, Unforgettable is anything but, taking a subject...

Femme Fatale Movie Review

Femme Fatale Movie Review

The only thing worse than a bad movie is a bad movie that takes itself...

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