Melissa Rauch has given birth to her first child.

The 'Big Bang Theory' actress admitted she is ''beyond over the moon'' after welcoming her and husband Winston Rauch's daughter Sadie into the world after previously suffering a miscarriage.

She posted a picture of an ''It's a girl'' card on Instagram, and wrote: ''I am beyond over the moon to share that our beautiful baby girl, Sadie Rauch, has arrived and our hearts are bursting at the seams with love for her. I will never take for granted the difficult road it took to get here. To those on that road: I'm sending you so much love today and always. (sic)''

The 37-year-old star - who plays Bernadette Rostenkowski-Wolowitz in the US sitcom - revealed in July she was pregnant but also admitted she had suffered a miscarriage in the past.

In a piece for Glamour magazine, she wrote: ''Here is the only statement regarding my pregnancy that doesn't make me feel like a complete fraud: 'Melissa is expecting her first child. She is extremely overjoyed, but if she's being honest, due to the fact that she had a miscarriage the last time she was pregnant, she's pretty much terrified at the moment that it will happen again. She feels weird even announcing this at all, and would rather wait until her child heads off to college to tell anyone, but she figures she should probably share this news before someone sees her waddling around with her mid-section protruding and announces it first.'''

Melissa admitted her miscarriage led to her feeling a ''primal depression'', and she was reluctant to announce her pregnancy because she was worried about upsetting other women who are struggling with fertility issues.

She explained: ''When I thought about having to share the news about expecting this baby, all I could think about was another woman mourning over her loss as I did, worried she would never get pregnant again, and reading about my little bundle on the way. It felt a bit disingenuous to not also share the struggle it took for me to get here.

''The miscarriage I experienced was one of the most profound sorrows I have ever felt in my life. It kickstarted a primal depression that lingered in me. (sic)''