Lena Dunham is ''obsessed with babies''.

The 32-year-old writer and actress had her uterus surgically removed due to severe endometriosis - a condition which causes the tissue that normally lines the inside of the uterus to grow outside of it - nearly a year ago, and has said that despite not being able to give birth now, she's been having ''actual childbirth dreams''.

Lena - who thinks the new obsession might be down to her new oestrogen protocol - wrote on Twitter: ''Sometimes in the middle of a joyful day the fact that I'll never be able to bear children hits me hard. I logically understand why this isn't a necessity- politically, emotionally etc. But you can understand and still not *know* It was a dream of mine.

''I started estrogen a week ago tomorrow and am suddenly obsessed with babies and having actual childbirth dreams. Is this biological? Can anyone with post-hysterectomy experience give me their thoughts? (sic)''

Fans then flooded the comments of the 'Girls' creator's tweets, telling her it was perfectly normal and should get better with time.

Last month, Lena went baby mad when she shared a ''potential baby name list'' on social media that she had written up with Jack Antonoff before their split in December after five years of dating.

Posting a picture of the list - which included traditional names such as Kelly, Jacki, and Eddy, alongside unique options like Na and Carrot - Lena wrote on Twitter: ''Hey @jackantonoff I just found a potential baby name list we made in 2015. I could definitely keep this private, but then the world wouldn't know that you suggested ''Carrot'' over and over... Love u!!! (sic)''

Although Lena and Jack, 34, have remained close since their split, the actress previously admitted the ''finality'' of their break-up conversation ''nearly killed'' her.

In an emotional essay published in May, Lena wrote: ''It was December when we broke up, that kind of confusing weather where glaring sunlight makes the cold air feel even colder. We sat in our shared kitchen of nearly four years and quietly faced each other, acknowledging what nobody wanted to say. That obsessive connection had turned to blind devotion, and the blinders were coming off to reveal that we had evolved separately (the least shocking reason of all and perhaps the most common). That anger wasn't sexy or sustainable. That our hearts were still broken from trying so hard to fix it but no longer uncertain about whether or not we could. The finality nearly killed me, and I remember muttering, 'But what if we still went on dates?' He laughed sadly. 'Whatever you want.'''