John Moore

John Moore

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Alasdair Elliott, John Moore, Jacques Imbrailo, Budd and Jeremy White - The BBC Proms at Royal Albert Hall - Tuesday 27th August 2013

Alasdair Elliott, John Moore, Jacques Imbrailo, Budd and Jeremy White

Jai Courtney, John Moore and Sebastian Koch - 'A Good Day to Die Hard' UK Premiere London United Kingdom Thursday 7th February 2013

Jai Courtney, John Moore and Sebastian Koch
Bruce Willis and Jai Courtney
Jai Courtney
Bruce Willis, Sebastian Koch and Jai Courtney
Bruce Willis and Jai Courtney
Jai Courtney

A Good Day To Die Hard Trailer


John McClane, a trigger happy New York cop, returns in the fifth movie of the 'Die Hard' franchise. This time, the terrorists he must face are based in Moscow, Russia. He flies there after discovering that his son Jack, with whom he has been estranged for some time, has got into some trouble with the Russian law enforcement and has been arrested. It doesn't take long for it to unravel that Jack has somehow got involved with a terrorist plot that McClane must pull him out of.

Continue: A Good Day To Die Hard Trailer

20th Century Fox Celebrates 25 Years Of 'Die Hard' With Mural On January 31st 2013

Posted on 01 February 2013

20th Century Fox Celebrates 25 Years Of 'Die Hard' With Mural On January 31st 2013

John Moore, Bruce Willis and Jai Courtney - "A Good Day to Die Hard" mural unveiling Los Angeles CA United States Thursday 31st January 2013

John Moore, Bruce Willis and Jai Courtney
John Moore
John Moore
John Moore

A Good Day To Die Hard - Teaser Trailer Trailer


John McClane, a trigger happy New York cop, returns in the fifth movie of the 'Die Hard' franchise. This time, the terrorists he must face are based in Moscow, Russia. He flies there after discovering that his son Jack, with whom he has been estranged for some time, has got into some trouble with the Russian law enforcement and has been arrested. It doesn't take long for it to unravel that Jack has somehow got involved with a terrorist plot that McClane must pull him out of.

'A Good Day To Die Hard' will become the gritty action film series' fifth instalment following 2007's 'Live Free or Die Hard', 1995's 'Die Hard with a Vengeance', 1990's 'Die Hard 2' and the original 'Die Hard' in 1988 that was based on the 1979 novel 'Nothing Lasts Forever' by Roderick Thorp. The previous movies have had three different directors and four different writers and this time we see director John Moore take on the role with a resume that includes 'Max Payne', 'The Omen' and 'Behind Enemy Lines'. 'Die Hard' number five has been written by Skip Woods ('Hitman', 'X-Men Origins: Wolverine', 'Swordfish') and will be released in UK cinemas on Valentine's Day next year (February 14th 2013).

Starring: Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, Amaury Nolasco, Cole Hauser, Megalyn Echikunwoke, Anne Vyalitsyna, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Aksel Hennie, Pasha D. Lychnikoff & Anne Vyalitsyna.

Alex Young and John Moore - Alex Young and director John Moore Saturday 2nd June 2012 on the set of 'A Good Day to Die Hard' in Budapest

Max Payne Review


OK
To paraphrase comedian/pundit Bill Maher, "New rule! Motion picture adaptations of successful video games must at least be as exciting and inventive as the product they are based on." Of course, Hollywood violates this mandate almost every time they take a game title and turn it into a film. With very few exceptions, the translation doesn't work. The latest victim of this mindless media reimaging is Max Payne. While avoiding much of what made the bullet-time-dependent third person shooter a hit, it tries to turn its tale of a haunted policeman desperate for vengeance into something otherworldly and epic. Until the oddball finish, it's just a lot of slo-mo stiffness.

Three years ago, Max Payne (Mark Wahlberg) was a cop. But after a trio of junkies killed his wife and child, he went a little nuts. Now, he spends his days digging through cold case files, and his nights tracking down unsuccessful leads. When a young woman named Natasha (Olga Kurylenko) is found murdered, his wallet in her hand, Payne is instantly a suspect. When his ex-partner (Donal Logue) also turns up butchered, they put Officer Jim Bravura (Chris "Ludacris" Bridges) on our hero's tail. Looking for answers, Max turns to his father's friend BB (Beau Bridges), now the head of security for the pharmaceutical company where his late wife worked, for some answers. It forces a confrontation with guilt ridden corporate toadie Jason Colvin (Chris O'Donnell), a link to insane ex-soldier Jack Lupino (Amaury Nolasco), the discovery of a highly addictive (and dangerous) drug named Valkyr, and a standoff with no-nonsense assassin Mona Sax (Mila Kunis). Whew!

Continue reading: Max Payne Review

The Omen (2006) Review


Very Good
My favorite character in John Moore's remake of The Omen is the Pope. I am not entirely sure which Pope it is, and it is more of a cameo role really, but every time the pontiff graced the screen, I knew why I liked this film so much. He first features in a brief conference scene. His cardinals (I presume) are concerned that a recent meteor shower is the final sign of the birth of the Anti-Christ, as predicted by the book of Revelations. These concerns are presented to the Pope in a multimedia display, with numerous screens airing a student film depicting scenes from the destruction of the Space Shuttle Columbia to September 11. In his second appearance, after hearing some disturbing news, the Pope drops his glass of red on the floor, while still in bed. I have never been to Vatican City, but I doubt this is how things go down. Yet, the film's disconnectedness from the laws of reality, personified here by its treatment of the leader of the Catholic Church, got me. Richard Donner's original Omen was a pig in a cocktail dress, a silly story treated with undeserving earnestness. Here, John Moore tells it like it should be told.Turns out the cardinals were on to something and the Anti-Christ is born. The unfortunate Anti-Joseph and Anti-Mary are Robert and Katherine Thorn (Liev Schreiber and Julia Stiles), the deputy to the U.S. ambassador to Italy and his young wife. When Katherine gives birth to a boy who dies just outside the hospital room, Robert accepts the offer of a priest at the hospital, taking in the child's place a baby boy whose mother died during labor and letting Katherine believe it is theirs. They name him Damien (cue choirs). After a bizarre explosion (so massive in scale it proves the devil doesn't pay for petrol) in which the U.S. ambassador dies, Robert takes the position and a promotion to the U.K. The family lives in British manor house bliss until, at a very public birthday for Damien (Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick), his nanny hangs herself, shrieking, "It's all for you!" From that moment forward the dangers of raising the Anti-Christ begin to become obvious. The black dogs begin to bark, monkeys screech, priests prophesize and a very un-Doubtfire-like nanny, Mrs Baylock (Mia Farrow), shows up to keep an eye on things.Moore doesn't stray widely from the path of the original's narrative and most changes made are welcome. I liked seeing a bit of determination in Damien's face. I liked that Katherine was young and seemed to be suffering post-partum depression. A lot of the dialogue is admittedly laughable, and Pete Postlethwaite and Michael Gambon as over-caffeinated priests add to a sense of the ludicrous. However, this only compounds its The Omen's minor brilliance. Everything is overdone: Damien sleeps on red silk sheets; people at the party start running and knocking over tables when the nanny kills herself; an interview with an old crippled man is conducted outside in the snow. The horror scenes are equally flamboyant; Marco Beltrami's score may lack the original's Latinized theme, but it kicks in to stunning and loud effect practically every time the lights go out.Schreiber is good as the politician and after a shaky start Stiles communicates her anguish very well. But it is Farrow (next to the Pope, of course) who steals the show. Her Mary Poppins performance oozes subtle menace in every sweet grin and glittery eye. When she unleashes eventually, it provides for the film's most exciting sequence - if you have dreamed for the day Rosemary would take on the Manchurian Candidate, dream no more. Though some critics might begrudge the film its directness, its loudness, perhaps its lack of class or cinematic restraint, I reveled in it. The story of Damien has always seemed a little stupid to me, and here Moore has matched the story with its telling. The result is fun, in a scary/jokey kind of way. I am not sure if John Moore is in on the joke he's telling in his remake of The Omen, but he tells it very well.If only she could do one pull-up.
John Moore

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John Moore Movies

A Good Day To Die Hard Trailer

A Good Day To Die Hard Trailer

John McClane, a trigger happy New York cop, returns in the fifth movie of the...

A Good Day To Die Hard - Teaser Trailer Trailer

A Good Day To Die Hard - Teaser Trailer Trailer

John McClane, a trigger happy New York cop, returns in the fifth movie of the...

Max Payne Movie Review

Max Payne Movie Review

To paraphrase comedian/pundit Bill Maher, "New rule! Motion picture adaptations of successful video games must...

Max Payne Trailer

Max Payne Trailer

Watch the trailer for Max PayneWhile reuniting with New Kids On The Block might not...

The Omen (2006) Movie Review

The Omen (2006) Movie Review

My favorite character in John Moore's remake of The Omen is the Pope. I am...

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