Jennifer Lawrence is working on a docuseries about the #MeToo movement.

The 'Hunger Games' star has confirmed she has teamed up with Catt Sadler to develop a television show about sexual harassment in Hollywood as well as the gender pay gap.

Referencing the docuseries at a 20th Century Fox x The Wing​ event​ in New York City, she said: ''I wasn't supposed to announce that but I am.''

Jennifer has been an advocate for equal pay for women and had previously penned an essay where she spoke of her devastation after finding out she was paid less than her male co-stars.

She wrote: ''It's hard for me to speak about my experience as a working woman because I can safely say my problems aren't exactly relatable. When the Sony hack happened and I found out how much less I was being paid than the lucky people with d***s, I didn't get mad at Sony. I got mad at myself. I failed as a negotiator because I gave up early. I didn't want to keep fighting over millions of dollars that, frankly, due to two franchises, I don't need. (I told you it wasn't relatable, don't hate me).

''But if I'm honest with myself, I would be lying if I didn't say there was an element of wanting to be liked that influenced my decision to close the deal without a real fight. I didn't want to seem ''difficult'' or ''spoiled.'' At the time, that seemed like a fine idea, until I saw the payroll on the Internet and realised every man I was working with definitely didn't worry about being ''difficult'' or ''spoiled.'' This could be a young-person thing. It could be a personality thing. I'm sure it's both. But this is an element of my personality that I've been working against for years, and based on the statistics, I don't think I'm the only woman with this issue. Are we socially conditioned to behave this way? We've only been able to vote for what, 90 years?''