Gwyneth Paltrow found it ''really shocking'' that she suffered post-natal depression after the birth of her second child.

The 'Mortdecai' star has spoken candidly in the past of how she felt after having son Moses, 12, and she's now admitted she never expected to go to such a ''dark place'' because she had felt so ''euphoric'' when she and then-husband Chris Martin had had their first child, daughter Apple, now 13.

Speaking to her mother Blythe Danner for the Goop podcast in an episode titled 'Gwyneth x Blythe: On Mothers and Daughters', she admitted: ''I think [it] was really shocking to me because I never thought that I would be a person who got post-natal depression.

''I was so euphoric when Apple was born, and I assumed it would happen with Mosey and it just ... it took a while. I really went into a dark place.''

Elsewhere during the chat, Gwyneth offered to buy her mother a sex toy when she said she wasn't interested in finding a new partner.

The 75-year-old actress - whose husband Bruce Paltrow died in 2002 - said: ''I have no interest [in finding her boyfriend]. Really I don't. If I got my heart broken, I'd probably jump off the railing. And I don't want to be bored, so it's one or the other.''

Her daughter quipped: ''I can also go to Goop.com and get you a vibrator.''

But the 'Detatchment' actress rejected the situation.

She said ''Thanks very much, but no thanks.''

The 'Iron Man' actress also suggested her mother should use dating apps after Blythe admitted she had become a ''bit of a hermit''.

Gwyneth said: ''I gotta get you on JDate. I gotta get you on Tinder, mom!''

The 45-year-old actress - who is now engaged to producer Brad Falchuk - previously admitted she felt like a ''zombie'' after Moses' birth and it made her worry she was a ''terrible'' mother.

She said: ''I felt like a zombie. I couldn't access my heart. I couldn't access my emotions. I couldn't connect.

''It was terrible, it was the exact opposite of what had happened when Apple was born. With her, I was on cloud nine. I couldn't believe it wasn't the same. I just thought it meant I was a terrible mother and a terrible person.''