George Peppard

George Peppard

George Peppard Quick Links

News Film RSS

Home From The Hill Review


Excellent
The trailer for Home from the Hill blares, "The story of the Hunnicutt Family and The Secret they hid too long! The town that talked too much and the love they tried to destroy!" In 1960, Home from the Hill, based on the bestselling book by William Humphrey, was the latest in the smoldering big-screen genre Hollywood was cooking up featuring big stars and Cinemascope vistas: Upscale Southern Decrepitude. Influenced by William Faulkner and Tennessee Williams, the genre showcased the likes of the blown-all-out-of-proportion The Long Hot Summer, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Douglas Sirk's simmering Written on the Wind. The films contained the same ingredients -- expansive manor homes, horny patriarchs, family secrets, and neurotic children ready to blow the lid off of everything. Home from the Hill has all that but it also has a bit more -- terrific acting by Robert Mitchum, George Hamilton, and George Peppard (forget Eleanor Parker, who plays her role like Blanche Dubois on the range), plus Vincente Minnelli as director.

Mitchum is a Texas landowner, Capt. Wade Hunnicutt, who owns the town, lives in a big house, and spends his time bedding down most of the women in the town (Wade comments at one point, "I'll tell you something -- I can't even remember which one she was"). Holding his face to the mirror is his wife Hannah (Parker), who for the past 17 years has locked her bedroom door to Wade, forcing Wade to take his biological urges elsewhere. Wade wants Hannah to forgive him and unlock the door. Hannah just gives him an icy stare. As their son Theron (Hamilton) remarks, "They live in the same house and kill each other a little at a time." Theron is their only son. He is 17 and now Wade wants to take him under his wing and show him how to be a man. Wade teaches Theron to hunt and has his hired hand Rafe (Peppard) show him the ropes as far as women are concerned. But then all hell breaks loose when Hannah reveals to Theron that Rafe is, in fact, Wade's illegitimate son. With the gloves off, Wade is forced into the realization that "We're rotten parents and we live in a rotten house." But by then it is too late for the Hunnicutts.

Continue reading: Home From The Hill Review

Pork Chop Hill Review


Very Good
Gregory Peck, along with a host of then-unknowns, star in this Korean War melodrama, about the taking of an unimportant hill on the eve of the end of the war. According to the production notes, this film is absolutely true, and it paints a disappointing picture of the bureaucracy of the U.S. Army and what it will do to "save face." Good film but not exceptionally memorable 40 years after the fact.

Pork Chop Hill Review


Very Good
Gregory Peck, along with a host of then-unknowns, star in this Korean War melodrama, about the taking of an unimportant hill on the eve of the end of the war. According to the production notes, this film is absolutely true, and it paints a disappointing picture of the bureaucracy of the U.S. Army and what it will do to "save face." Good film but not exceptionally memorable 40 years after the fact.

Breakfast At Tiffany's Review


Extraordinary
A near perfect blend of comedy, romance, and minor tragedy, Breakfast at Tiffany's is a must-see classic that, despite diversions from Truman Capote's original novel, remains his clearest statement on what it feels like to be young, ambitious, and on the make in a rapacious city full of hidden agendas.

Set in present-day 1961 (as opposed to during World War II as in the novel), the film introduces us to the gorgeous Holly Golightly (a sparkling Audrey Hepburn) as she staggers home early one morning in her little black dress and sunglasses after yet another all-night bender during which she likely doled out small favors to amorous older gentlemen in exchange for rent money. Pausing in front of Tiffany's, Holly munches a danish and sips coffee as she admires the jewelry in the window. It's an iconic movie moment. Holly sees herself as a free-spirit, a party girl, someone who, as she puts it, won't be caged by love or commitments. It's a lonely life, but it pays the bills. The'60s are on the verge of swinging.

Continue reading: Breakfast At Tiffany's Review

George Peppard

George Peppard Quick Links

News Film RSS
Advertisement

Occupation

Actor


George Peppard Movies

Breakfast At Tiffany's Movie Review

Breakfast At Tiffany's Movie Review

A near perfect blend of comedy, romance, and minor tragedy, Breakfast at Tiffany's is a...

Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.