W. The Movie

"Terrible"

W. The Movie Review


W. The Movie is nearly two hours long. My life is two hours shorter because of this movie. A better use of time would have been to watch a (short) documentary on the making of the "film," which might have provided some small insight into the filmmakers' mindsets. Did anyone actually think this was a watchable piece of media? The filmmakers can't truly believe this movie is as "visually challenging" or "socially important" as the company's Mission Statement claims, can they?

To be clear, this film is not Oliver Stone's W. On this movie's website, they say that's a good thing. No, W. The Movie is, according to the DVD synopsis, "a surreal satire on the presidency of George W. Bush." It should continue, "in which less-than-amateurish actors strut around wearing elaborate face paint in front of computer-generated backdrops, attempting to hammer home social points that have been made a thousand times before in a thousand more effective ways." The film's one strong statement is that W. is a "vulgar farce," but unfortunately, so is the film.

Attempting to describe this plot is nearly as futile as trying to make sense of it as it plays on the screen. From what I could tell, the movie makes no drastic changes to the events of George W. Bush's presidency other than to depict Bush, his staff, prominent national figures on both sides of the aisle, and most segments of the American people, as crude caricatures in clown make-up and stupidly exaggerated costumes. Rednecks are toothless and speak in over-the-top Jeff Foxworthy accents. Ha ha. The "Dubya" character refers to African-Americans as "darkies." Hee hee. None of these stereotypes are employed for any other reason than the filmmakers though their mere presence would be subversive. Because they serve no purpose other than to be mocked, the film becomes offensive in addition to incompetent.

This is what happens when a desperate, wannabe-director teaches himself how to operate a cheap digital effects program but doesn't have a clue how to make a movie. W. The Movie is a visual clusterfuck of crude CG animation and insultingly inept green-screen work. The only thing more off-putting than the imagery is the content that takes place in front of that imagery. In truth, the film looks exactly like what it is: a piece of rancid garbage made by a gung-ho amateur who forces all his long-suffering friends to act in his home movie. I made tons of those as a young movie-obsessed kid, but they remain on the camcorder tapes used to record them, and that's where they belong.

Alfred Eaker is the "gung-ho amateur" behind W. The Movie, and if there is one thing that can be said for him, it's that he believes in his work with all his heart. It would be mildly heartening, if the movie weren't such nonsensical drivel. Eaker is also a good sport in front of the camera, playing what seems like half the movie's characters himself, in various stages of zany clown-face. He is willing to make himself look absolutely ridiculous; his performances seem like vague, half-assed imitations of the villains from the Joel Schumacher Batman movies. To his credit, Eaker strikes me as one smart cookie, since he is so obscured in makeup that no one will be able to recognize him in real life.

Stone's W., for all potential criticisms one could level at it -- too jokey, too kind, too soon -- was a real movie. It told a story, had a viewpoint, served a valid purpose. W. The Movie is not a real movie. It is a ridiculous piece of rambling performance art. It is a smug, one-note joke. It's a vanity project made by people who haven't earned the right to be vain.

Where's Rummy when you need him?



W. The Movie

Facts and Figures

Run time: 95 mins

In Theaters: Friday 20th March 2009

Box Office Worldwide: $64.3M

Budget: $5M

Production compaines: Paramount Pictures

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 1 / 5

IMDB: 5.1 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: Alfred Eaker, Ross St. Just

Producer: Alfred Eaker

Starring: as Himself, as Himself, as Himself, as Himself, as Himself, as Himself, as Himself, as Wee Man, Ehren McGhehey as Himself, Brandon DiCamillo as Himself, as Himself, as Herself, Jess Margera as Himself, Stephanie Hodge as Herself

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