The Wackness

"Very Good"

The Wackness Review


Shrouded in the haze of a Manhattan summer circa 1994 and Giuliani's great push for a whitewashed New York, Jonathan Levine's very entertaining The Wackness takes the coming-of-age story and attempts to give it a little history. The cultural touchstones of the '90s are picked bare: Kurt Cobain's suicide, the release of Notorious B.I.G.'s Ready to Die, Aaron Spelling's 90210, the turntable as the new musical lynchpin, and the ever-present love of a good toke. But where most films of this nature seem to rely on a central premise (e.g. My brother is dating my high school teacher who I have a crush on! How will I deal?!), Levine's has a respectful restraint and an eye for mood that eschews normal coming-of-age structure.

In Central Park, Luke Shapiro (Josh Peck of Nickelodeon's Drake + Josh) pushes an Italian Ice cart filled with dime bags of herb, compliments of a Rastafarian dealer (a welcome cameo by Method Man) who introduces the young dealer to a mix tape of Biggie. It's not exactly clear how Shapiro begins to trade eighths of green for therapy sessions with Dr. Jeffrey Squires (the ever-reliable Ben Kingsley) but from the moment the relationship begins, it's clear the two were made for each other. That isn't to say that friendship is the only thing that Shapiro finds alluring about the good doctor: The teen entrepreneur has a major jones for Squires' stepdaughter Stephanie (Olivia Thirlby in a bravura performance).

The Wackness won the Audience Award at this year's Sundance Film Festival, an unsurprising accolade considering its pedigree. A star from Nickelodeon, the goofy sidekick from Jason Reitman's Juno, the best illegal cash crop known to man, and a preference for jams from the Golden Age of hip-hop: The Wackness has all the right moves for a story that has already been filmed approximately 30 thousand times. But The Wackness is not dependent on artistry either: From its cast to its linear narrative to its virginity jokes, this is an audience film through-and-through.

As Dr. Squires seeks sanctuary from his frigid wife (Famke Janssen) with his new friend and a groovy, Phish-lovin' neo-hippie (Mary Kate Olsen), Shapiro romances Steph with lessons in drug-dealing, bottles of Crazy Horse and a mixtape of jams by The Pharcyde and De La Soul. She repays him with a weekend at her family's beach house in Fire Island, where she deflowers late-bloomer Luke after a few belts of whiskey. Steph explains her relationship with Shapiro eloquently: "I'm all about the dopeness but you're all about the wackness." A consummate modern girl, the doc's daughter wants to have fun, and the fact that a few hearts might get broken is not entirely her concern. Mr. Levine might be telling Luke's story, but he has a dedication to Steph that cannot be ignored.

Levine is very aware of his time, but being a teenager in love sucks no matter what year it is. What Levine gets across better than anything is the juxtaposition between how seriously we take something as fickle as love at that age and the utter goofiness of the world where we are told to propagate it. In this sense, I suspect many a teenage boy will see Luke and notice a kindred spirit. But like any decent stoner, The Wackness only has a passing interest in heartbreak and romance. Feeling good and snack food are much higher on the to-do list.

Now that's wack.



The Wackness

Facts and Figures

Run time: 99 mins

In Theaters: Friday 29th August 2008

Box Office USA: $2.0M

Box Office Worldwide: $2.9M

Budget: $6M

Distributed by: Sony Pictures Classics

Production compaines: SBK Pictures, Occupant Entertainment

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 3.5 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 69%
Fresh: 88 Rotten: 39

IMDB: 7.1 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: Jonathan Levine

Producer: Keith Calder, Felipe Marino, Joe Neurauter

Starring: as Dr. Squires, as Kristin Squires, as Luke Shapiro, as Stephanie, as Union, as Eleanor, as Percy, as Justin, as Mrs. Shapiro, as Mr. Shapiro, as Grandpa Shapiro, Joanna Merlin as Grandma Shapiro, Shannon Briggs as Bodyguard #1, Roy Milton Davis as Homeless Man, Alexander Flores as Kid in Bar

Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Star Wars: The Last Jedi Movie Review

Star Wars: The Last Jedi Movie Review

After the thunderous reception for J.J. Abrams' Episode VII: The Force Awakens two years ago,...

Daddy's Home 2 Movie Review

Daddy's Home 2 Movie Review

Like the 2015 original, this comedy plays merrily with cliches to tell a silly story...

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

The Man Who Invented Christmas Movie Review

There's a somewhat contrived jauntiness to this blending of fact and fiction that may leave...

Ferdinand Movie Review

Ferdinand Movie Review

This animated comedy adventure is based on the beloved children's book, which was published in...

Brigsby Bear Movie Review

Brigsby Bear Movie Review

Director Dave McCary makes a superb feature debut with this offbeat black comedy, which explores...

Battle of the Sexes Movie Review

Battle of the Sexes Movie Review

A dramatisation of the real-life clash between tennis icons Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs,...

Shot Caller Movie Review

Shot Caller Movie Review

There isn't much subtlety to this prison thriller, but it's edgy enough to hold the...

Advertisement
The Disaster Artist Movie Review

The Disaster Artist Movie Review

A hilariously outrageous story based on real events, this film recounts the making of the...

Stronger Movie Review

Stronger Movie Review

Based on a true story about the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, this looks like one...

Only the Brave Movie Review

Only the Brave Movie Review

Based on a genuinely moving true story, this film undercuts the realism by pushing its...

Wonder Movie Review

Wonder Movie Review

This film may be based on RJ Palacio's fictional bestseller, but it approaches its story...

Happy End  Movie Review

Happy End Movie Review

Austrian auteur Michael Haneke isn't known for his light touch, but rather for hard-hitting, award-winning...

Patti Cake$ Movie Review

Patti Cake$ Movie Review

Seemingly from out of nowhere, this film generates perhaps the biggest smile of any movie...

The Limehouse Golem Movie Review

The Limehouse Golem Movie Review

A Victorian thriller with rather heavy echoes of Jack the Ripper, this film struggles to...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.