The Singing Revolution

"Excellent"

The Singing Revolution Review


When one of the participants in Estonia's bloodless "singing revolution," an affable activist/artist named Heinz Valk, tells the camera that they successfully chased out the Soviets with "a song and a smile," it's a striking moment. Nowhere else could culture, song, and defiance come together so powerfully as they did in the small Baltic nation of Estonia. Revolutions, by and large, are often marked by dramatic upheaval -- fires in the streets, bullets passing overhead, tanks rumbling through cities, bodies, blood, and tears -- they rarely happen in slow, determined waves of peace. And I doubt there have been many successful revolutions, like Estonia's, fought in song.

James and Maureen Castle Tusty's 2006 documentary, The Singing Revolution, is a superb tribute to Estonia's accomplishment. Comprised mostly of archival footage, interspersed with modern interviews, The Singing Revolution not only provides a detailed (though never dull) overview of the revolution but also of Estonian culture.

Estonia has had a long history of foreign occupation. The Swedes, the Danes, the Germans... for most of Estonia's early history it was an occupied by one larger country or another. Following a few very brief years of independence, the country was annexed by the Soviet Union, the Third Reich, and then the Soviet Union again in 1944. The Singing Revolution really starts here, with the subjugation of Estonia by WWII's most tyrannical forces. The Nazis shipped them off to camps. The Russians shipped them off to gulags. While there was a guerilla war in the '50s (Estonian had "forest brothers," one of whom is interviewed in the film), Estonia was firmly in the grip of the USSR. And this is when something amazing began to happen.

Estonians love to sing. It's as though they're programmed for it. They sing as children and as adults. Young and old alike delight in folk songs and hymns and crowd the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds every year. And these people don't just stand around and listen to performers. They all sing. All of them. Vast crowds of thousands, hands linked together, flowers in their hair, swaying like a tide, they sing together. In the mid-'80s, dissatisfaction growing, participants at the festivals began to talk openly about singing Estonian anthems and waving Estonian flags (both banned outright under Soviet rule). In 1987, demonstrators, 300 thousand in number (1 out of every 3 Estonians), converged on the Tallinn Song Festival Grounds singing their hearts out and waving Estonian flags. This happened, and kept happening, for four years. And when Russia sent in tanks, in 1991, the Estonians formed human shields, singing in front of radio towers and television stations. With the Soviet Union crumbling in the background, Estonia officially declared independence on August 20, 1991.

While it sounds rather simple, a musical David vs. Goliath, there were, naturally, all manner of complications and confrontations. From rival Estonian groups vying for the public voice to Moscow's own undermining convulsions, the "singing revolution" was much more than a "love conquers all" unity fest. It's worth pondering if anything similar could happen in a country not as mono-cultural, or as small, as Estonia.

The Singing Revolution, as a documentary, is a sterling work. It's hard to watch this and not fall in love with the people of Estonia, but it's even harder to not come away with a renewed faith in humanity. The Singing Revolution is a film that joyfully celebrates the power of the human spirit in all its glory.

There are several DVD versions of the film: a single disc with special features (commentary and shorts), a three-disc collector's edition (with additional in-depth interviews, reproduced documents, and performances), as well as an educator's version (with special features similar to those included in the collector's edition.



The Singing Revolution

Facts and Figures

Run time: 94 mins

In Theaters: Saturday 1st December 2007

Distributed by: Mountain View Productions

Production compaines: Mountain View Productions, Northern Lights

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 4 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 84%
Fresh: 31 Rotten: 6

IMDB: 8.5 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director: James Tusty, Maureen Castle Tusty

Producer: Bestor Cram, Thor Halvorssen, Artur Talvik, James Tusty, Maureen Castle Tusty

Starring: as Narrator

Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

Murder on the Orient Express Movie Review

The latest adaptation of Agatha Christie's 83-year-old classic whodunit, this lavish, star-studded film is old-style...

Paddington 2 Movie Review

Paddington 2 Movie Review

The first Paddington movie in 2014 is already such a beloved classic that it's hard...

A Bad Moms Christmas Movie Review

A Bad Moms Christmas Movie Review

Everyone's back from last year's undemanding adult comedy, plus some starry new cast members, for...

Brawl in Cell Block 99 Movie Review

Brawl in Cell Block 99 Movie Review

Filmmaker S. Craig Zahler brought a blast of offbeat creativity to the Western genre two...

The Death of Stalin Movie Review

The Death of Stalin Movie Review

Fans of the film In the Loop and the TV series Veep will definitely not...

Call Me By Your Name Movie Review

Call Me By Your Name Movie Review

Set in northern Italy in the summer of 1983, this internationally flavoured drama is a...

Thor: Ragnarok Movie Review

Thor: Ragnarok Movie Review

The most riotously enjoyable Marvel movie yet, this action epic benefits hugely from the decision...

Advertisement
Breathe Movie Review

Breathe Movie Review

While this biopic has the standard sumptuous production values of a British period drama, it's...

The Snowman Movie Review

The Snowman Movie Review

With a cast and crew packed with A-list talent, this film seems like it should...

The Party Movie Review

The Party Movie Review

Comedies don't get much darker than this pitch-black British movie, written and directed by Sally...

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) Movie Review

The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) Movie Review

Noah Baumbach (Frances Ha) is on his way to becoming the new Woody Allen, which...

6 Below Movie Review

6 Below Movie Review

Based on an astonishing true survival story, this film is subtitled "Miracle on the Mountain",...

Mother Movie Review

Mother Movie Review

Darren Aronofsky doesn't make fluffy movies, and has only had one genuine misfire (2014's Noah)....

Blade Runner 2049 Movie Review

Blade Runner 2049 Movie Review

It's been 35 years since Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic, which was set in 2019....

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.