Multiplicity

"Good"

Multiplicity Review


I hate it when a film sounds like it's going to be great, has a hilarious teaser-trailer, stars some wonderful actors, features a small role played by the daughter of one of my film review subscribers, and ends up falling a bit flat on the screen.

Such is the case with Multiplicity, the new Harold Ramis-Michael Keaton comedy about a guy who clones himself in order to get a little free time.

Doug (Keaton) is a construction contractor with way to much responsibility at work and not enough time to do it. His wife (Andie MacDowell) never sees hubby, and neither do the kids. Doug's stress is getting so severe that he seems on the verge of a breakdown, and eventually he does so -- a couple of times -- before being talked into having himself cloned by a doctor in Malibu.

Doug #2 (Keaton) is a gruff mensch who takes over Doug's job and never looks back. Deciding that still isn't enough, Doug opts for another in #3 (Keaton), who takes on the personality of a fey househusband obsessed with soufflés, Tupperware, and the non-crumpledness of aluminum foil. And when #2 and #3 decide they don't have enough time themselves, they get together to clone #4 (Keaton), who doesn't turn out quite as sharp as expected, shaving his tongue and keeping pizza in his wallet.

Yes, it does sound funny, and Keaton does some of his best work here, hamming it up to an extreme -- particularly with the fall-down funny #3: the Martha Stewart inside all of us.

But what to do about that darned script? Rewrite after rewrite has taken its obvious toll, and the thing comes off as shredded as a bowl of cole slaw, with very funny moments (watch for "Vista de Nada") interspersed with lifeless exposition. Keaton does his best, but it isn't enough to maintain more than a mild chuckle-average during the course of the film.

Also of note: Multiplicity has the dubious honor of being the second movie in a row that Andie MacDowell stars in that she did not single-handedly ruin (the first being Unstrung Heroes). Let's hear it for Andie!

But I found the most interesting part of the movie's premise painfully avoided, and I'll ask it here for the reader to ponder: Just how much does it cost to get a clone?

And Kari, you were great.



Facts and Figures

Run time: 117 mins

In Theaters: Wednesday 17th July 1996

Distributed by: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Production compaines: Columbia Pictures Corporation

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 3 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 44%
Fresh: 20 Rotten: 25

IMDB: 5.9 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director:

Starring: as Doug Kinney, as Laura Kinney, as Leeds, as Vic, Zack Duhame as Zack Kinney, Katie Schlossberg as Jennifer Kinney, as Del King, as Noreen, as Ted, Judith Kahan as Franny, as Walt, as Paul, as Robin, as Beth, Kari Coleman as Patti, Steven Kampmann as Coach Jack, as Irate Football Parent, Skip Stellrecht as Irate Football Parent, as Maitre d', Robin Duke as Ballet School Receptionist, Suzanne Herrington as Den Mother, Robert Ridgely as Laura's Father, as Building Inspector, Dennis R. Lyell as Construction Worker, Richard Plon as Lab Technician Twin, Harold Plon as Lab Technician Twin, George D. Wallace as Man in Restaurant, Justine A. Johnston as Woman in Restaurant, Michael Klesic as Carpenter (uncredited)

Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Hampstead Movie Review

Hampstead Movie Review

Deliberately appealing to older audiences, this undemanding comedy-drama comes with a hint of social relevance...

The Book of Henry Movie Review

The Book of Henry Movie Review

Apparently, this offbeat script had been making the rounds in Hollywood for some 20 years...

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

With this fifth Transformers movie, it seems clear that Michael Bay is still trying to...

Churchill Movie Review

Churchill Movie Review

This drama about the iconic British prime minister tells a darkly personal story set over...

Gifted Movie Review

Gifted Movie Review

This is one of those films that dances right up to the edge of soapy...

Whitney: Can I Be Me Movie Review

Whitney: Can I Be Me Movie Review

Notorious British filmmaker Nick Broomfield teams up with Austrian music documentary producer Rudi Dolezal to...

The Mummy Movie Review

The Mummy Movie Review

To launch their new Dark Universe franchise, Universal has taken an approach that mixes murky...

Advertisement
My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

Daphne du Maurier's 1951 mystery-romance novel has been adapted for theatre, radio, TV and film,...

Wilson Movie Review

Wilson Movie Review

It's never helpful when a comedy becomes a bit too smug about its own quirkiness....

Interlude in Prague Movie Review

Interlude in Prague Movie Review

A fictionalised story from the life of Wolfgang Mozart, this lavishly produced period drama is...

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

This British satirical comedy may be a bit of a mess, but since it's based...

Detour Movie Review

Detour Movie Review

This may look like a rather typical American indie thriller, but British filmmaker Christopher Smith...

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Boldly optimistic, this action-packed adventure breathes fresh life into the DC universe with a welcome...

Baywatch Movie Review

Baywatch Movie Review

Clearly, it's a risky proposition adapting a cheesy vintage TV series for the big screen:...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.