Double Jeopardy

"OK"

Double Jeopardy Review


Double Jeopardy does not take place during the latter half of a game show. However, it has a similar amount of credibility.

There's an old adage in screenwriting: You can make something up, and it doesn't have to be real. It just has to be believable. In other words, you can make up the lines for a priest to read at a wedding, as long as they sound plausible. No one's going to know if you miss a few "Amens." However, this liberty does not extend to making up laws on which to base the premise of your film.

Double Jeopardy has the bizarre distinction of probably being the first movie to completely rest its fortunes on the fact that you'll buy make-believe legislation. And if you believe the filmmakers, you simply can't be tried for the same crime twice. So if your husband (Greenwood) fakes his death and frames you (Judd) for it, and then you get convicted, and then six years later you stalk him down to kill him, then you can't be found guilty of murder, because you were already tried (and convicted) for that.

Right? Wrong. Very wrong. Wrong to the point that it's scary to think that maybe the filmmakers maybe didn't realize it at any point during the production.

The plot of Double Jeopardy is very plain and obvious (Tommy Lee Jones chases vengeance-obsessed Judd for an hour while she tracks down hubby, just like in The Fugitive). And while the thriller is pedestrian and straightforward and otherwise dull, the theater erupts in laughter every time that "double jeopardy" clause is trotted out. You keep expecting for someone on screen to explain to Judd how the law works, but they never do, and Jones's character is an ex-law professor!

Not that I should feel surprised. Bruce Beresford hasn't made a good movie since 1989 (Driving Miss Daisy). While Jones is campy and fun to watch, and I could be entertained watching Ashley Judd make toast for two hours, the film does not redeem itself with these minimal, guilty pleasures (see also: Entrapment). This isn't Double Jeopardy. It's a $100 warm-up question.

Question: What film are you going to look back at with remorse, Ashley (you know, besides Kuffs)?



Double Jeopardy

Facts and Figures

Run time: 105 mins

In Theaters: Friday 24th September 1999

Box Office Worldwide: $177.8M

Budget: $70M

Distributed by: Paramount Pictures

Production compaines: Paramount Pictures

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 2.5 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 25%
Fresh: 21 Rotten: 63

IMDB: 6.3 / 10

Cast & Crew

Director:

Starring: as Travis Lehman, as Elizabeth "Libby" Parsons, as Nicholas "Nick" Parsons / Jonathan Devereaux, as Angela "Angie" Green, Benjamin Weir as Matty - Age 4, as Bobby, as Rudy

Contactmusic


Links



Advertisement

New Movies

Hampstead Movie Review

Hampstead Movie Review

Deliberately appealing to older audiences, this undemanding comedy-drama comes with a hint of social relevance...

The Book of Henry Movie Review

The Book of Henry Movie Review

Apparently, this offbeat script had been making the rounds in Hollywood for some 20 years...

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

Transformers: The Last Knight Movie Review

With this fifth Transformers movie, it seems clear that Michael Bay is still trying to...

Churchill Movie Review

Churchill Movie Review

This drama about the iconic British prime minister tells a darkly personal story set over...

Gifted Movie Review

Gifted Movie Review

This is one of those films that dances right up to the edge of soapy...

Whitney: Can I Be Me Movie Review

Whitney: Can I Be Me Movie Review

Notorious British filmmaker Nick Broomfield teams up with Austrian music documentary producer Rudi Dolezal to...

The Mummy Movie Review

The Mummy Movie Review

To launch their new Dark Universe franchise, Universal has taken an approach that mixes murky...

Advertisement
My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

My Cousin Rachel Movie Review

Daphne du Maurier's 1951 mystery-romance novel has been adapted for theatre, radio, TV and film,...

Wilson Movie Review

Wilson Movie Review

It's never helpful when a comedy becomes a bit too smug about its own quirkiness....

Interlude in Prague Movie Review

Interlude in Prague Movie Review

A fictionalised story from the life of Wolfgang Mozart, this lavishly produced period drama is...

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

The Hippopotamus Movie Review

This British satirical comedy may be a bit of a mess, but since it's based...

Detour Movie Review

Detour Movie Review

This may look like a rather typical American indie thriller, but British filmmaker Christopher Smith...

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Wonder Woman Movie Review

Boldly optimistic, this action-packed adventure breathes fresh life into the DC universe with a welcome...

Baywatch Movie Review

Baywatch Movie Review

Clearly, it's a risky proposition adapting a cheesy vintage TV series for the big screen:...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.