Bomb The System

"Good"

Bomb The System Review


The tagline for this movie, "Graffiti Can Be A Powerful Weapon" doesn't get it right. What this glimpse into the life of public wall-covering artists -- taggers, if you will -- really seems to be saying is that this nocturnal habit is a ticket to public loathing, constant fear of arrest, immersion into a degrading existence, and, possibly, an early and violent end.

Twenty-three year old debuting writer-director Adam Bhala Lough amps up the life of a graffiti bomber in a visual style generated on the cutting table. And, while some might call a technique of overlapped time cuts, freeze frames that thaw, jump frames and general image deviltry a daring adventure in underground cinema, others may see it as too much hip stylization.

Some might also argue that the editorial gymnastics appropriately suggests a loose anchoring to convention, not unlike its subject matter. But to Lough's credit, erratic editing disappears when it comes time to tell the story. In moments of serious dialogue, he modulates the film into downright conventional moviemaking. Two-shots, over-the-shoulders, familiar angles, and straight shooting provide the necessary clarity.

"Let's go bombing" is the call to the streets to prowl for prominent and unmarred wall space, a knapsack of stolen (must be stolen!) cans of paint on your shoulder, a lot of mural-making, and/or environmental defacement. You don't have much time. You're making a statement; publishing your mind and mentality, making yourself famous.

Blest (Mark Webber, People I Know) is a good looking virtuoso of the art who hangs with a similarly motivated paint crowd, a motley group of individual crews. His own posse is pretty much himself and best friend, Justin, tag "BUK50," (Gano Grills) with neophyte Kevin, tag "LUNE," (Jade Yorker) on lookout. And it's Justin, the original founder of the crew who dreams someday of leaving his mark on the grand opus, the Brooklyn Bridge, who isn't too pleased when Blest is distracted by sexy Alexandra (Jaclyn DeSantis) because it interferes with their main business and mars their tight loyalty.

Mom isn't too pleased either with her 19-year old's reluctance to seize the opportunity when he's accepted by the university of her choice, where he would have the opportunity to segue into daylight society and develop his talent along gallery and/or commercial lines.

When we meet vandal cop Bobby Cox (Al Sapienza), a lawman who's been on the bomber stakeout beat for years, we recognize a sociopath stereotype hiding behind badge power when we see one. Bonz Malone as Cox's partner, Officer Nole Shorts, is a less obvious creation to counterbalance the bad cop on the edge of losing it.

Pushing the sympathy buttons for these miscreants may be more than we can hack, but what we do get here are some splendid performances from up and coming actors worth watching. Webber demonstrates an inherent capacity to reach down into emotional territory even though he can't quite convince us that a person of his caliber and life choices is typical of the culture or ethos. He brings to mind Eminem in 8 Mile, but without the benefit of an appealing form of expression.

Jaclyn DeSantis has an exquisite naturalness in a role that is, perhaps, less fully realized, but she does enough with it to convey some inner depth and outer sensuality. Cinematographer Ben Kutchins provides the shadowy underground textures, and music by Ethan Higbee and El Producto generates a lifting excitement.

Humanizing the world of vandals and giving them the benefit of kind understanding is worthy as a storytelling objective, but I came out of this wishing the paint can crowd would settle for tattoos.

The DVD includes deleted scenes, interviews, and behind the scenes footage.



Bomb The System

Facts and Figures

Run time: 91 mins

In Theaters: Sunday 1st December 2002

Distributed by: Palm Pictures

Reviews

Contactmusic.com: 3 / 5

Rotten Tomatoes: 32%
Fresh: 7 Rotten: 15

IMDB: 6.6 / 10

Cast & Crew

Producer: ,

Contactmusic


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