Ernest Borgnine

Ernest Borgnine

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Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame Monday 9th July 2012 Hollywood veteran Ernest Borgnine's Hollywood Walk of Fame star

Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame
Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame
Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame
Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame
Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame
Ernest Borgnine and Walk Of Fame

Ernest Borgnine Thursday 22nd March 2012 spotted leaving the doctors office on Bedford Drive

Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine

Ernest Borgnine Monday 6th February 2012 visits the doctors office in Beverly Hills

Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine

Ernest Borgnine Friday 3rd February 2012 heading to a Doctor's appointment in Beverly Hills

Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine

Ernest Borgnine Monday 5th December 2011 leaves Madeo restaurant in West Hollywood Los Angeles, California

Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine

Red Review


OK
Based on the graphic novel, this action-comedy has a wacky tone that's entertaining but never involving. At least the strong all-star cast makes the most of the vivid characters, and the film's visual style keeps us watching even if there's nothing to it.

When "Retired, Extremely Dangerous" Frank Moses (Willis) has his quiet life disrupted by trigger-happy commandos he goes on the run, kidnapping a hapless pension clerk (Parker) to protect her from a ruthless high-tech hitman (Urban) who's chasing him. He then reassembles the old team from his black ops days, including smooth womaniser Joe (Freeman), paranoid nutjob Marvin (Malkovich) and seductive Victoria (Mirren). He even gets in touch with his former Russian nemesis Ivan (Cox). It all has something to do with a scandal involving the American Vice President (McMahon).

Continue reading: Red Review

Red Trailer


What happens to retired agents? Well, most of them retire and leave the life of espionage for something altogether more normal. Frank Moses is one of those guys, in his time he was one of the CIA's top black ops agents but now he's left his old life behind him for retirement, there's one slight problem with Frank's retirement plan, his CIA file has been marked RED, Retired and Extremely Dangerous. Frank and his old work colleagues must reunite and find answers to why they've become the CIA's most wanted.

Continue: Red Trailer

Strange Wilderness Review


Weak
Take the second-tier crew from both Adam Sandler's posse (Allen Covert, Peter Dante) and Judd Apatow's regulars (Jonah Hill, Justin Long) and throw them together in a comedic spin on a Wild Kingdom type set and what do you get? A few chuckles rolled in with a lot of gross-out humor.

Steve Zahn headlines the directorial debut of Joe Dirt screenwriter Fred Wolf, playing Peter Gaulke, the stoner son of a famous Crocodile Hunter-like dad whose show Strange Wilderness was once a mega-hit. After dad died and Peter took over, things went downhill, with Peter turning in episodes punctuated by absurd narration and questionable nature... unless you count girls flashing their breasts in the shrubs behind the office building "nature." Peter defends the segment, of course, claiming them to be "natives."

Continue reading: Strange Wilderness Review

Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project Review


OK
At the New York Film Festival screening of John Landis' Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project, subversion was in the air as Landis strolled out to introduce the film and, peering into the audience, asked William Lustig, the director of Maniac Cop, to take a bow. The excitement continued when the lights dimmed and Harry Dean Stanton in the film began warbling "Old Blue" in Dan Tana's Restaurant. Landis' camera then picks up Rickles' empty dressing room at the Stardust in a series of masterly composed shots of vacant chairs and silent bric-a-brac -- Ozu in Vegas. But then banality set in.

Landis very quickly assumes the role of the Los Angeles Chapter President of The Don Rickles Fan Club. Legions of comics and actors are trotted out (much in the manner of The Aristocrats) to praise the brilliance and hilarity of the master of the comic insult. These interviews are interspersed with clips from Rickles' films -- Kelly's Heroes, Run Silent, Run Deep, The Rat Race, X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes, Beach Blanket Bingo -- along with television excerpts from The Tonight Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. The Man Himself is interviewed and asked to comment on his life and art. Centering the whole mishmash is footage of Rickles' nightclub act at the Stardust -- an act Rickles had heretofore adamantly refused to be filmed.

Continue reading: Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project Review

Mr. Warmth:The Don Rickles Project Review


OK
At the New York Film Festival screening of John Landis' Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project, subversion was in the air as Landis strolled out to introduce the film and, peering into the audience, asked William Lustig, the director of Maniac Cop, to take a bow. The excitement continued when the lights dimmed and Harry Dean Stanton in the film began warbling "Old Blue" in Dan Tana's Restaurant. Landis' camera then picks up Rickles' empty dressing room at the Stardust in a series of masterly composed shots of vacant chairs and silent bric-a-brac -- Ozu in Vegas. But then banality set in.

Landis very quickly assumes the role of the Los Angeles Chapter President of The Don Rickles Fan Club. Legions of comics and actors are trotted out (much in the manner of The Aristocrats) to praise the brilliance and hilarity of the master of the comic insult. These interviews are interspersed with clips from Rickles' films -- Kelly's Heroes, Run Silent, Run Deep, The Rat Race, X: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes, Beach Blanket Bingo -- along with television excerpts from The Tonight Show and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. The Man Himself is interviewed and asked to comment on his life and art. Centering the whole mishmash is footage of Rickles' nightclub act at the Stardust -- an act Rickles had heretofore adamantly refused to be filmed.

Continue reading: Mr. Warmth:The Don Rickles Project Review

The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review


Excellent
This exciting and underseen film features James Stewart at the top of his late-career game, offering the far-fetched yet strangely compelling tale of a group of air crash survivors who, trapped in the Sahara Desert and with no other options in sight, decide to build a miniature plane out of the giant air hulk they crashed in. Sure, the odds of crashing your plane with a flotilla of tools, jet fuel, pressed dates, and a welding apparatus -- but without a working radio or much water -- isn't exactly believable, but somehow director Robert Aldrich (The Dirty Dozen) makes it work, and work well. Will this bizarre contraption really work? It's two and a half nail-biting hours during which personalities violently crash, schemes are hatched, and a career-making secret is revealed.

Continue reading: The Flight Of The Phoenix (1965) Review

The Dirty Dozen Review


Very Good
Can The Dirty Dozen really be 40 years old? Well, almost. This watershed film paved the ways for bad-guys-as-heroes flicks ranging from The Wild Bunch to Reservoir Dogs, and its influence is still felt today. Yet how can The Dirty Dozen feel so tired when viewed in this millennium? Maybe its a cast that, though exquisite, is a bit much. The Dirty Dozen also appears to have paved the way for the Airport movies, studded with megastars and short on plot. Viewed today, too much of Dozen is schlocky and trite, reliant on stereotypes that border on Hogan's Heroes-level characterizations to tell the WWII-era story. (Writ large: 12 career criminals are given a last chance to pull off a major anti-Nazi mission.) The film is pioneering, daring, and very well made. But there's a bit much to go around, and now you can see the actors jockeying for notice among each other. Still a good film, though its impact is now starting to fade.

Continue reading: The Dirty Dozen Review

Barabbas Review


Good
Any good Christian or Jeopardy! fan knows that Barabbas was the murderer that the Romans chose to free rather than Jesus when Pontius Pilate asked them to pick someone to receive a pardon. The film (based on the novel of the same name) imagines -- with minimal attention to anything that is historically known -- what might have happened to Barabbas after he was freed, tracking him back into a life of crime, a decades-long sentence of hard labor, and a stint in the gladiator pit, all before he's eventually redeemed through the message of the man who hung on the cross instead of him. Barabbas, in keeping with the Biblical epics of its era, is overwrought and overlong, but Anthony Quinn is memorable in the leading role, even when the script is derivative of everything from Spartacus to Ben-Hur, films which were still fresh in the public's mind. Barabbas has aged poorly in comparison (though Spartacus isn't the masterpiece many wish it to be, either).

Marty Review


Very Good
Marty is one of cinema's most famous nice guy losers -- and he's possibly the winningest one at the Oscars. Originally an hour-long TV movie, Marty was reimagined by writer Paddy Chayefsky as a feature film about his hero, a butcher (Ernest Borgnine) who still lives with his mother and can't find a woman to save his life. Eventually he finally finds a nice girl (Betsy Blair), but getting around society and the all-seeing eye of ma (Esther Minciotti) isn't so easy. Tragicomic and simple, Marty's celebrated status is rightly earned, but it may be a bit to naive and simplistic for today's hard-bitten audiences.

Blueberry Review


Excellent
Moebius, aka Jean Giraud, is best known as the artist who revolutionized Continental comic books in the 1960s and 1970s. His work, highly stylized and fittingly surreal, is synonymous with science fiction illustration and the premier adult fantasy comic magazine, Metal Hurlant (Heavy Metal, in the states.) While he began his work as an illustrator for various French magazines and fanzines, it wasn't until the 1970s, when he adopted the pen name Moebius, that his work became internationally recognized. Despite his frequent forays into science fiction and fantasy, his western strip Blueberry (with Jean-Michel Charlier) is perhaps his best-known work. While Mike Blueberry, the cowboy hero of the eponymous strip, has traveled the dusty back roads for over 30 years there has not been a film adaptation of his adventures until now.

Jan Kounen, the Dutch cause celebre responsible for the hyperactive cult film Dobermann, tackles the epic story of Blueberry with a careful, almost blissed out style - much to the dismay of fans of his earlier work. Blueberry is a meditative work, a somnambulist's ramble through western history and psychedelica. The film is slowly paced but crescendos in a special effects blowout, a literal celluloid peyote trip, which would make Alejandro Jodorowsky jump with joy. (That isn't a random aside, Blueberry is as close an homage to Jodorowsky's El Topo as a big budget western can get.)

Continue reading: Blueberry Review

Ernest Borgnine

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Ernest Borgnine Movies

Red Movie Review

Red Movie Review

Based on the graphic novel, this action-comedy has a wacky tone that's entertaining but never...

Red Trailer

Red Trailer

What happens to retired agents? Well, most of them retire and leave the life of...

Strange Wilderness Movie Review

Strange Wilderness Movie Review

Take the second-tier crew from both Adam Sandler's posse (Allen Covert, Peter Dante) and Judd...

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The Wild Bunch Movie Review

The Wild Bunch Movie Review

I am one of the few surviving appreciators of second bests. In hindsight, my second...

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