Diplo thinks the future of global pop has a ''bleak future''.

The DJ and producer - who has worked with stars including Beyonce, Madonna, Britney Spears, Justin Bieber and Snoop Dogg - believes there are no big breakthroughs in the international music scene anymore.

Diplo told The Guardian newspaper: ''Every once in a while you have breakthroughs - Latin music's having a moment. But I can't see it going further than that.''

But the 'Revolution' hitmaker also sees a positive side to this - claiming musicians can make more mistakes with their music now, and no one remembers them,

The 39-year-old star said: ''In 2018 you can make as many missteps as possible. Nobody remembers the bad music you made. Justin Bieber is a good example: people just remember that he made a great album in 'Purpose'.''

And the producer won't be mourning the death of pop when it comes.

He said: ''I never want to ride the wave of the trends. I want to start them or mess them up.''

Last year, Diplo released new single 'Bankroll,' featuring Young Thug, Rich the Kid, Rich Chigga and Justin Bieber rapping. Days later he deleted the track from Soundcloud after it flopped with fans.

He later claimed he had removed Bieber from the track at the request of fellow producers DJ Khaled and David Guetta because they had exclusive deals with him.

In 2015, Diplo and Skrillex collaborated with Bieber on hit dance record 'Where Are U Now'.

He said at the time that he wanted to make people think Bieber was cool again.

Diplo said: ''Justin had kinda hit rock bottom with things, like from the press, from jail, and from, like, taking his pants down at an awards show or something. I wasn't even paying attention, but I know that he wasn't very cool. And I was trying to really help Skrillex rebrand his own project, too. If nothing else, I thought working with Bieber would be the most noticeable thing we could do. It would be a great record, and it would make everyone really f***ed up...

''If I make a record that makes people think that Justin Bieber is cool and makes them dance to it - which seems to be one of the most daunting tasks ever - then maybe people will rethink the way they think about music, you know?''