Charlie Sheen wants Lindsay Lohan to ''stay the course'' in her sobriety journey.

Both Charlie, 53, and Lindsay, 32, have suffered with addiction in the past, and after the 'Platoon' star recently celebrated one year of sobriety, he has said he hopes his former co-star - who worked with him on 'Scary Movie 5' and 'Anger Management' - can follow in his footsteps and keep up her sobriety.

He told Us Weekly magazine: ''I always had tremendous affection for her. I can totally relate to some of the stuff she had gone through, was going through.

''[I'd] just tell her, just stay the course. You can't change the past, but they wouldn't call it that if it wasn't, right?''

Lindsay recently insisted she's put her partying ways behind her, and is now focused on running her own chain of nightclubs instead of spending her time partying in them.

She said: ''That was so in my past. Most of my friends [now], actually, who own nightclubs and stuff aren't drinkers or anything.

''Because I'm running the show, I have to be on it and I have to keep myself busy. It's more fun to watch other people have their own fun with what they're doing. There's no judgment in it though. It has nothing to do with my past.''

Meanwhile, Charlie celebrated one year of sobriety in December 2018, and after sharing a picture of his sobriety medallion - which is often handed out by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) recovery programs to celebrate passing the milestone - on social media, he says he ''feels good'' to have passed the first hurdle on his journey.

Speaking about getting his medallion, he said: ''That was good, yes, indeed - had to be done. I feel good.''

Charlie has famously battled with addiction for several years, and was previously sober for 11 years before turning back to old habits as a coping mechanism when he was diagnosed as HIV positive in 2011.

Speaking in 2016, he said: ''There was a stretch where I didn't drink for 11 years. No cocaine, no booze for 11 years. So I know that I have that in me.

''[My relapse] was to suffocate the anxiety and what my life was going to become with this condition and getting so numb I didn't think about it. It was the only tool I had at the time, so I believed that would quell a lot of that angst. A lot of that fear. And it only made it worse.''