Brie Larson thinks ''ambition'' has kept her back from realising her true potential.

The 'Kong: Skull Island' star may have a number of awards to her name - including an Oscar - but she feels having ambition has made her ''narrow in thought''.

She said: ''I've been acting pretty much my whole life, and I've always had ambition. I loved that word, like, 'No, I'm not gonna stay out late because I have ambition.' And in the past year, I've realised ambition is really something that made me not see the expanse of everything going on. It made me narrow in thought.

''So I'm less concerned about a trajectory and more interested in the meandering path of it. I like making films because I like expressing the human condition. And I want, right now, to make films that make people feel more connected to themselves and the people in their theatre and in the rest of the world. That's what film can bring.''

And the 27-year-old actress thinks movies have the potential of raising world issues and promoting positive messages and is glad to be a part of that as an actress.

She added: ''We can still have a positive message in an Imax 3D movie. Movies can be fun, entertaining and visually stunning, and raise questions. They can connect people ... Twitter used to be really awesome for jokes and passing on pictures of cute outfits, but now it feels kind of silly to do that.

''Now I'm in this new position, it's important to me to pass on positive information so young people realise what's happening and how they can be more active at a local level. It's a powerful period for people to realise that their voices are being heard and that we're all incredibly dynamic and complex. I'm learning so much about different people from all over the world.''

The 'Room' star feels a ''great responsibility'' to be a strong woman that young girls can look up to.

She told The Sunday Times' Culture magazine: ''I feel a great responsibility. I want to create this symbol of strength and humour for women that I really wish I had had growing up. It feels so valuable.

''We need to break through that glass ceiling - women go to the theatre to see a movie with a male lead, and men will go see a film with a female lead. We're all equals here.''