Bob Dylan has finally addressed his Nobel Prize win.

The 75-year-old musician is to be the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, but has caused controversy after he failed to speak publicly about being named as the winner of the award and reportedly refused to answer any calls from the Nobel committee.

Now, the 'Blowin' in the Wind' hitmaker has finally spoken out about the honour - which will see him receive a cheque for £750,000 from the King of Sweden, King Carl XVI Gustav - branding it as ''amazing [and] incredible''.

Speaking to the Daily Telegraph newspaper, the songwriter said: ''Absolutely [I will go to the ceremony]. If it's at all possible.

''It's hard to believe. [It's] amazing, incredible. Whoever dreams about something like that?''

The news of his acknowledgement comes after Swedish Academy member Per Wastberg voiced his frustration at the star's inability to return their phone calls regarding the award.

He said previously: ''One can say that it is impolite and arrogant... He is who he is.

''We were aware that he can be difficult and that he does not like appearances when he stands alone on the stage''.

Meanwhile, the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy Sara Danius has compared the works of the 'Like a Rolling Stone' hitmaker to that of the ancient Greeks.

She said: ''If you look back, far back, 2,500 years or so, you discover Homer and Sappho, and they wrote poetic texts that were meant to be listened to, they were meant to be performed, often together with instruments, and it's the same way with Bob Dylan. But we still read Homer and Sappho... and we enjoy it, and same thing with Bob Dylan. He can be read, and should be read.''

Earlier this month, a notice on the 'Knockin' On Heaven's Door' singer's website featured the text ''WINNER OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE'' in a piece promoting a book of his lyrics, however it was later removed.

If Bob does decide to attend the event, he will appear in Stockholm, Sweden, on December 10.