Blair Brown

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Blair Brown - Netflix's 'Orange Is The New Black' Season 4 - New York City Premiere at SVA Theatre 333 W 23rd St, New York, NY 10011 - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 16th June 2016

Blair Brown

Blair Brown, Haviland Morris and Katie Kreisler - Opening night of 'Nikolai and the Others' at the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center - Departures - New York, NY, United States - Monday 6th May 2013

Blair Brown, Haviland Morris and Katie Kreisler
John Glover and Blair Brown
Blair Brown, Haviland Morris, Betsy Aidem, Katie Kreisler, Lauren Culpepper and Kathryn Erbe

Blair Brown Tuesday 13th September 2011 New York premiere of 'Completeness' at the Playwrights Horizon Theatre - Arrivals New York City, USA

Blair Brown

Blair Brown and Ethel Barrymore Sunday 21st November 2010 The Premiere of Elling at The Ethel Barrymore Theater - arrivals New York City, USA

Blair Brown and Ethel Barrymore

Blair Brown Tuesday 10th August 2010 Opening night afterparty for the Off-Broadway production of 'Secrets of the Trade' held at Sarabeth's Restaurant New York City, USA

Blair Brown
Blair Brown
Blair Brown
Jason Butler Harner, Amy Aquino and Blair Brown
John Glover, Elizabeth Wilson, Jason Butler Harner, Blair Brown and Bill Brochtrup

Loverboy Review


Bad
Much like Robert Towne's recent adaptation of Ask the Dust, Kevin Bacon's Loverboy is a labor of love. Sometime in 2003, Kyra Sedgwick (Bacon's spouse) handed him a copy of Victoria Redel's novel, Loverboy, and both found themselves eager to bring the story to the screen. And similar to Towne's effort, Bacon is so enthusiastic about the material that he can't get his concentration correct.

Emily Stoll (Sedgwick) is in her late 20s and roaming the Midwest and just about everywhere else for the right ejaculate. After a miscarriage from a "no father," multi-partner pregnancy, she meets Paul (Campbell Scott) and in one night of passion, a child is conceived. The son, Paul aka Loverboy (Dominic Scott Kay), quickly becomes Emily's entire life, trying to make life a magical, ongoing discovery. Emily has nightmarish flashbacks of her lovebird parents (Bacon and Marisa Tomei) who were too busy being in love to take care of a child properly, and she daydreams of her fantasy mother, Mrs. Harker (Sandra Bullock). Loverboy eventually becomes wise to his mother's obsessive grasp on him and begins to revolt, especially when she tries to seduce Mark (Matt Dillon), a father figure. This, of course, can't end well.

Continue reading: Loverboy Review

Continental Divide Review


Very Good
For one of his final films, John Belushi detoured into an odd choice of roles, as a hard-nosed, chain-smoking Chicago reporter (OK, that part's not too much of a stretch), who takes a trip to the Rocky Mountains to hang out with a bald eagle researcher (Blair Brown) when his crime reporting lands him into a bit of trouble in Chi-town. While the story is generally fun and lively, Brown's charm carries the film over Belushi's goofy performance. Still, you'll probably marvel more at how well kempt a woman that never leaves a mountain shack can be.

The Astronaut's Wife Review


Terrible
A few days ago I saw The Sixth Sense. I thought the problem with that movie was that it lost most of my interest before the movie got interesting. In The Astronaut's Wife, the new, excruciating thriller from New Line, it never got interesting. What it did was steal from other movies. The basic concept smells like Species, and they even stole that "glass slowly falling from the hand of the person and shattering on the floor shot" from The Usual Suspects.

Johnny Depp stars as Spencer Armacost, an astronaut who loses communication with NASA while fixing a satellite. Upon his return, strange occurrences begin with Spencer's partner, who was up there with him, and his partner's wife. This, of course, starts up the paranoia with Spencer's wife Jillian (Charlize Theron).

Continue reading: The Astronaut's Wife Review

Hamlet (2001) Review


Essential
When most people think of Shakespeare they cringe, thinking of melodrama, costumes, and strange vocabulary. But what happens if you pare down the stereotypical theatrical imagery of Shakespeare and simply concentrate on the characters in the story?

This new version of Hamlet, directed by Campbell Scott (The Spanish Prisoner) and Eric Simonson does just that, and beautifully so. The setting is Americanized (the post-Civil War-era South), the production design simple, and nobody is forcing an accent unknown to them. It makes you want to scrounge for the books you packed away in high school because you didn't feel like figuring them out at the time.

Continue reading: Hamlet (2001) Review

Dogville Review


Good
Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it strangely pops up in town, Lars von Trier's much-anticipated Dogville has such intense extremes of useful experimentation and annoyingly repetitive patronization (a tendency throughout his respectable filmography) that the sum of its parts comes out evenly average.

Predictability reigns for much of the film, because we've seen the story far too often before. A stranger comes to town where the residents are skeptical of outsiders. She proceeds to go out of her way to ingratiate herself, they finally accept her, and then show their true colors against her of what they fear to inflict on one another due to extended co-habitation. The dysfunction turns into a gang of all versus one, regardless of any normal sense of morality, which they are able to slowly rationalize. On the one hand, the unhurried process through which this evolves respects the fact that nobody changes actions or views over night. But because we know it's going to happen, the path to getting there feels arduous.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

Dogville Review


Weak

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who play them) has finally crescendoed to a deafening din of indiscriminate, exasperating martyrdom in "Dogville," a daring experiment in heightened performance and minimalist filmmaking that is fatally undermined by the Danish writer-director's conceit as a narrator.

His last four movies ("Breaking the Waves," "The Idiots," "Dancer in the Dark" and now "Dogville") have all dealt largely with the psychological (and sometimes physical) torture of vulnerable female protagonists. While his storytelling and cinematic style are almost always compelling, he's never seemed so arbitrary in his sadism than in this allegory of a beautiful, 1930s flapper fugitive hiding from the mob in a ragged, remote, austere Colorado mountain hamlet, where the tiny populace goes from distrustful to accepting to maliciously cruel on little more than von Trier's say-so.

Played with discernible dedication by Nicole Kidman, Grace is a porcelain enigma of self-flagellation so determined to escape some kind of shadowy past that, in exchange for the skeptical township's shelter, she agrees to indentured servitude -- doing handy work, favors and manual labor one hour a day in each of the seven households. She gradually comes earn the friendship of all -- even those most reluctant to accept her.

Continue reading: Dogville Review

Blair Brown

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Katy Perry Performs 'Rise' And 'Roar' In Support Of Hillary Clinton At DNC

Katy Perry Performs 'Rise' And 'Roar' In Support Of Hillary Clinton At DNC

Perry performed 'Rise' and 'Roar' before Clinton accepted the nomination to be the Democrats' presidential candidate.

Bruce Springsteen will release music from 1966 in new album

Bruce Springsteen will release music from 1966 in new album

Bruce Springsteen will release rare tracks from 1966 in new album 'Chapter and Verse', which will accompany his autobiography 'Born To Run'.

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4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

Not broadcast in its entirety since 1967, a full restoration will be played in select cinemas to support Ron Howard's 'Eight Days a Week' touring...

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Blair Brown Movies

The Astronaut's Wife Movie Review

The Astronaut's Wife Movie Review

A few days ago I saw The Sixth Sense. I thought the problem with...

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Hamlet (2001) Movie Review

Hamlet (2001) Movie Review

When most people think of Shakespeare they cringe, thinking of melodrama, costumes, and strange vocabulary....

Dogville Movie Review

Dogville Movie Review

Evoking the age-old parable of human nature pillaging the likes of total goodness when it...

Dogville Movie Review

Dogville Movie Review

Lars von Trier's peculiar compulsion to humiliate his heroines (and by extension the actresses who...

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