The Cosby Show star, 79, is already due to stand trial in June, 2017 to fight three charges of aggravated indecent assault, relating to an alleged incident with former Temple University employee Andrea Constand at his Pennsylvania home in 2004.

The veteran actor, who maintains his innocence, was not charged with any criminal counts at the time of Constand's complaints, but he did settle a civil suit with the alleged victim in 2006, when they struck a private agreement.

Last year (15), Constand launched legal action against Bruce Castor, the Pennsylvania prosecutor who declined to pursue charges, accusing him of suggesting she failed to convey the seriousness of the alleged attack to police, compared to the incident she described in her 2005 lawsuit.

She is due to give evidence as part of that suit, and Cosby's lawyers petitioned U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno to allow the star to attend the hearing to ensure Constand does not break the terms of their confidential settlement.

The request was heard in court on Monday (03Oct16), when the judge dismissed the motion, but allowed Cosby's lawyers to review the testimony after the deposition, reports The Associated Press.

Robreno also declined to let Cosby sit in on the planned deposition of Castor's former deputy.

Cosby's criminal case was reopened last year (15) after the actor's sealed deposition in his Constand civil suit was made public, revealing he had confessed to buying sedatives to give to women he wanted to sleep with.

More than 50 women have come forward with decades-old accusations of inappropriate behaviour, drugging and/or rape against Cosby since late 2014. The statute of limitations has expired in almost all of the cases, preventing the alleged victims from pursuing formal charges.

The embattled comedian has denied all allegations, and his legal team has tried and failed on numerous occasions to have his current assault charges dismissed.